New York City

Welcoming Our Newest Cohort of Fellows!

Today kicks off our fall retreat in Boston! We are so excited to reconnect and share out learnings from each of our organizations. This will be our newest cohort of fellows first FAO retreat! Below you can get to know the newest FAO Schwarz Family Foundation Fellows a bit better:

Molly Blake

Molly works at Playworks New England, where half of her role is devoted to serving as a Meet Molly New FAO Fellow (1)Senior Program Coordinator at all Playworks based partner schools. The other half of her role is devoted to developing Playworks family engagement plan and improving their college volunteer strategy.

When asked what she was most looking forward to during her tenure as a FAO Schwarz Family Foundation Fellow, Molly said: “I am looking forward to helping with the community engagement and social-emotional learning aspects of the Playworks programming. I am also looking forward to building relationships with the other fellows along with deepening my leadership skills.”


Samantha Perlman 

Samantha works at Generation Citizen in Boston, where half of her role is devoted to direct service activities that focus on empowering Generation Citizen’s young people. The other half of her role will be devoted to long-term organizational strengthening.

Meet Samantha New FAO Fellow (1)When asked what she was most looking forward to during her tenure as a FAO Schwarz Family Foundation Fellow, Samantha said: “Being a FAO Fellow excites me because I have the opportunity to connect and collaborate with a great cohort of motivated and dynamic young leaders in the non-profit field. I am thrilled to be working at Generation Citizen as this organization encompasses my previous experience in education and government. I cannot imagine a more perfect match and I look forward to putting my interests into action!”


Pam Martinez

Pam works at Playworks Pennsylvania, where half of her role is devoted to consulting,Meet Pam New FAO Fellow (1) supporting, and co-facilitating at Playworks partner schools. The other half of her role is devoted to developing marketing, brand building, and recruitment initiatives.

When asked what she was most looking forward to during her tenure as a FAO Schwarz Family Foundation Fellow, Pam said: “I am looking forward to strengthening the program within our Playworks schools by building closer relationships with the community. I also look forward to meeting the other fellows and furthering my professional growth.”


Jaiwantie Manni

Jaiwantie works at Museum of the City of New York, where half of her role is devoted to Meet Jaiwantie New FAO Fellowteaching existing school and summer field trips. The other half of her role is devoted to assisting with the creation, implementation, and marketing of Family and Community Engagement Programs for the Center.

When asked what she was most looking forward to during her tenure as a FAO Schwarz Family Foundation Fellow, Jaiwantie said: “Creating STEM programs for the Museum of the City of New York as well as being involved with and helping with the Family and Community Engagement Program. I am most excited about meeting the students, teachers, and families of New York and learning more about the city I grew up in.”


Kayla Jones

Kayla works at Jumpstart, where half of her role is devoted to coordinating & delivering Jumpstart Community events throughout NYC. The other half of her role is devoted to Meet Kayla New FAO Fellowbuilding capacity in Jumpstart’s new Policy & Government Relations department.

When asked what she was most looking forward to during her tenure as a FAO Schwarz Family Foundation Fellow, Kayla said: “Being raised around educators inspired my passion for working in the field of education. This fellowship allows me to both serve in communities that need equitable educational opportunities and slowly deconstruct the policies that created these disparities in the first place. Working at Jumpstart combines my interests in community engagement and policy work, and I welcome the new experiences and connections I’ll make during my time here.”

3 Ways the FAO Schwarz Family Foundation Fellowship Made Me a Better Leader

Special Project: coordinating the annual Riverkeeper Sweep. For my special project in my first year at Riverkeeper I worked closely with the Director of Community Engagement to coordinate the 6th Annual Riverkeeper Sweep, our day of service for the Hudson River and its tributaries. Previously I had the opportunity to coordinate small straightforward events like campus film screenings, community rallies, and service projects, but had never organized an event on such a considerable scale. At first the prospect of coordinating an event of this scale felt impossible.

How would I keep track of 109 locations, over 100 registration pages, and ensure each Sweep Leader had the training, materials, skills, and volunteers necessary for a successful project?

Under the guidance of the Director of Community Engagement, Dana Gulley, I learned to manage moving parts such as tide dependent cleanup times, waivers, data management, Sweep Leader training, and successfully collaborating with 164 individual leaders. With Dana’s partnership and a strong plan with weekly deadlines, we achieved the most successful Riverkeeper Sweep yet, with 109 Sweep projects, and 2,200 volunteers across NYC and the Hudson Valley who removed 48 tons of debris and plant to maintain over 800 trees and shrubs.

Building on the skills I learned last year, I was the primary organizer of the 2017 Riverkeeper Sweep, which achieved a count of 101 projects from Brooklyn to the Adirondacks with over 1,300 participating volunteers.

Direct Service: supporting Riverkeeper campaigns. The drinking water contamination crisis in Newburgh, New York has allowed me to grow my skills as a community organizer, by developing a comprehensive outreach plan, building relationships with new partners, and executing strategic community education and outreach. These efforts have helped raise awareness about toxic chemical contamination to Newburgh’s drinking water supply, pressure the Department of Health to conduct blood testing, and to spread the word about the blood testing program. Working with communities such as Newburgh has taught me to think outside the box and find non-traditional partners, outreach methods, and the responsibility to amplify existing community voices. It’s easy to step into a situation and make your voice or the voice of your organization the center of attention. What’s instead needed, is to listen and learn from the community you are serving and amplify their concerns and goals.

Goal setting and prioritizing professionally AND personally. Since the start of my Fellowship at Riverkeeper my work schedule has included weekend events and night meetings across New York City and the Hudson Valley. In the beginning it was easy to orient my life around my job and the challenging expectations I was working to meet while unknowingly neglecting personal goals. Quickly I learned the value of prioritizing during work and personal time and having goals in both areas of my life. Last winter I set a goal to climb all 46 Adirondack high peaks over the next few summers while acquiring the necessary skills and gear. With this goal in mind, I’ve prioritized incorporating almost daily exercise and frequent weekend hikes into my weekly plan. Prioritizing exercise has allowed me to be more focused in the office, and I have climbed 9/46 peaks with 5-10 more planned for summer 2017.

Jen Benson is an FAO Schwarz Family Foundation Fellow at Riverkeeper. As the Education and Outreach Coordinator, she creates opportunities to increase youth environmental awareness and engagement with the Hudson River. She also works to support campaign and programmatic initiatives, and helps coordinate the Riverkeeper Sweep.

Three Tips for Current FAO Fellows from a Supreme Fellow

Fall has begun, which means it’s time to congratulate our first years as they transition to the second year of the fellowship alongside welcoming our newest cohort of FAO Fellows!

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As a Supreme Fellow, I would like to extend my congratulations and welcome by complying with my millennial ways and writing a Buzzfeed-esque blog post highlighting 3 tips I wish I would have known when I started the FAO fellowship two years ago.

Your education continues — push yourself to learn as much as you can even when it is outside of your own “expertise”.

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By the time I was a senior in college, I was already itching to leave the classroom and begin my career as a young professional. The discussions and content I picked up in the classroom seemed detached from the real world. The minute I began working at my fellowship site, I began to gain a different form of education; I learned about systemic issues like high school access in New York City as well as more subtle yet enriching skills such as how to manage college students or my personal favorite, how to create organized systems between your personal life and work life. #worklifebalanceisreal

One way I continued to pick up this unofficial professional development was by signing up for any opportunity I could get in my new job. Extra work event where I would support with registration? I am there. A team member from the operations department needs support? Sure, I can help! In these moments I was able to observe how events worked, why operations is the foundation to any organization and what specific projects I enjoyed.

Quick random tip: Don’t be afraid to ask questions! As a fellow this is your moment to ask, given that you can use the fellowship as an excuse to learn more about the organization. People love to talk about themselves and their work!

Take yourself seriously by calculating and documenting your work outcomes.

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By the second year of my fellowship, my responsibilities extended much farther than the original job description. My work expanded into recruitment, sustaining school partnerships and writing a semester’s worth of curriculum; valuable skills I am grateful for practicing.

Because I was so immersed in my work, when I started polishing my resume it was hard to think of all of my professional outcomes. So tip #2: As you work on these additional projects and continue to develop your professional skills, write them down onto your resume and make sure to add your results!

Organizations today are goal-focused and are looking for the quantitative impact you made with your work. For example, on my resume, instead of Wrote and instructed 8th grade curriculum; I typed: Wrote, developed and instructed 8th grade curriculum composed of a total of 12 workshops (over 18 hours of instruction) with the goal to produce top quality high school applications. Organizations want to hear that you are all about results. Let the numbers speak for your work.

Use your network within the FAO fellowship!

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Do not get it wrong. Just because I am writing advice to you today doesn’t mean that I have it all figured out. During my fellowship, I struggled with creating a work/life balance, learning how to manage up, and everything in between.

Fortunately, I had another fellow in my cohort that worked at my same organization which helped a lot when I needed to talk to someone. This experience taught me that if you ever have these struggles, do not hesitate to use your network because you are not alone. The first network you automatically have when you are a part of this fellowship is your FAO crew, current cohort and alums! Invite someone to coffee or reach out through an email; our FAO fellowship community is always out to support a fellow!

Good luck!

Gabriella Gómez is the Academic Coordinator at the Harlem RBI South Bronx site, a year round development program that incorporates academic, social-emotional and baseball/softball enrichment. During her fellowship, Gaby worked at Breakthrough New York as the High School Placement Coordinator. When she is not writing curriculum, visiting schools, or facilitating workshops with her middle schoolers, she can be found carefully updating her Spotify playlist, working on her bullet journal or playing with her most adorable 2-year-old nephew, Diego.

Conquering Millennial Anxieties: Lessons from service

I have never been a fan of phone calls.JOE

My childhood anxiety around the idea of picking up the phone and dialing family members or girls I liked only increased as texting grew popular and threw the original form of communication out into the retro dump of futility. So when one of the high school seniors I was working with called my cell phone, I was scared. Had she already heard bad news from one of her early action schools? Did I forget to mention a scholarship deadline? What potential maelstrom had befallen us?

Instead, she announced through tear-filled elation that she had received the Posse Scholarship, a full-tuition ride that also served as a gateway to a “posse” of other students attending the same school that would stay with her as she traversed her four years of higher education. Moreover, this scholarship was to Brandeis University, a strong academic institution and one she had been eyeing throughout the college process.

Though I was undoubtedly proud of her incredible accomplishment, what made me the most emotional was the fact that she continued to thank me, as if I were the one who made the decision or carried the brunt of the work. I responded with incredulity, pushing the onus back on her and congratulating her again and again for the incredible journey ahead of her. But what this interaction cemented for me was the impact moments like these—and the journeys required to get there—have on our students.

It comes as no surprise that getting to college can prove to be extremely hard for the population of students we serve; the combination of institutionally-driven restrictions, financial burdens, and implicit feelings of mediocrity causes many young scholars to falter and doubt their potential. As a first-generation man of color from an underserved community in Los Angeles, I have felt these uncertainties creep up at the most inopportune moments. Without reassurance from trusted sources, these suspicions can derail and destroy students’ paths to successes.

This is the reason I came Breakthrough New York as an FAO Schwarz Family Foundation Fellow in the first place—to allow the fresh ideas of our next generation of leaders to flourish and mature as they traverse an environment that sometimes seeks to reject or stifle. To be completely transparent, this job can be difficult sometimes; serving students of all needs demands an attention to detail and a perseverance that can sometimes be exhausting. But when you get to witness moments like these, feel the emotions shine through with every letter of admission or internship acceptance, any doubt or frustration once had fades away.

It’s why I do what I do. And it’s why even when I feel my heart flutter, when a student calls, I pick up the phone.

 

Joseph Rosales is the FAO Schwarz Family Foundation Fellow and High School Coordinator for Breakthrough New York, a college success program that works with high-achieving, underserved students from across New York City. Using his own experiences as a first-gen student of color, he supports high school students in any way they need in an effort to help prepare them for the educational road ahead.